Capote – Filtered

Theatrical Release: November 11, 2005
DVD Release: March 21, 2006
Capote – Filtered
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

This docudrama explores the curious motivation for “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” author Truman Capote (Philip Seymour Hoffman) as he immerses himself in the gruesome 1959 murder of an obscure family in Kansas. Capote was enjoying his sophisticated life and reputation as a writer for The New Yorker when a news article about the killings caught his eye. Capote and his friend Nelle Harper Lee (Catherine Keener), author of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” travel to Holcomb, Kansas, where he begins to write the book “In Cold Blood.” He convinces the clean-cut Perry Smith (Clifton Collins Jr.), one of the convicted killers, to share his journals and eventually discovers that he and Perry share some of the same demons.

Dove Review

“Capote” is a true-life story of a writer/author who writes the book “Cold Blood”. He goes face to face with the murderers and finds out everything that happened the night of a Kansas farm house murder. Truman Capote was a homosexual and implied that he had a relationship with another man. But nothing was ever shown. He was a heavy drinker and ended up dying from that. But the movie wasn’t about that. It showed how he got all his information to write the book and how he actually went to the prison and talked to the murderers. There was a lot of drinking shown throughout the film.

Content Description

Faith: None
Violence: Gun shots (nothing shown), man hung (we see him begin to fall).
Sex: An inferred homosexual relationship, but nothing overt. Two men live together.
Language: None
Violence: Gun shots (nothing shown), man hung (we see him begin to fall).
Drugs: Constant drinking by Capote who ultimately died of alcoholism.
Nudity: None
Other: None

Info

Company: Sony Picture Classics - old
Writer: Gerald Clarke (book) Dan Futterman (screenplay)
Director: Bennett Miller
Producer: Caroline Baron
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 98 min.
Reviewer: Hannah Kortz