Invisible: The Story and Hope of Mexico’s Street Kids

DVD Release: November 1, 2018
Invisible: The Story and Hope of Mexico’s Street Kids
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Imagine if your children lived on the street, in a makeshift shack under a bridge, or in the sewer. This is the reality of 20,000 kids in Mexico City. Follow singer-songwriter Ree Boado as she looks for answers in this 22 million-person city.

Dove Review

Documenting the true struggles of homeless kids in Mexico, Invisible is an inspiring call and a loving challenge for Christians to minister to the needy. Singer-songwriter Ree Boado journeys to Mexico, befriending the homeless and seeking to help. The experience is a descent into poverty and despair, both literally and figuratively, with sewers becoming shelter, rampant drug addiction, and spiritual warfare. Yet, in the midst of the darkness, the Light of God is the solution. The documentary is an inspiration for believers to do something: go to the mission field, donate, pray.

Invisible shows the need for Godly love. The affliction on the homeless is distressing. Child abuse, including beatings and sex trafficking, is discussed. A major problem for the homeless is drug addiction, especially for huffing solvent, and it’s graphicly depicted and discussed. We see people, including teens, huffing the solvent and hear about kids getting high. There are stories of violence, and we see a man’s bandaged head and beaten face. One child has AIDs. Children die in the streets. It is unflinching and emotional. However, Invisible is an encouragement to minister, especially to those in poverty. A gospel message is presented, and Scripture is referenced. With a run time of less than an hour, mature individuals may find it impactful viewing for a church group who understands and is prepared for the distressing content. The darkness and poverty are not shied away from, and neither is the beautiful grace of God. This movie receives the Dove-Approved 18+ Seal, with caution regarding its mature and distressing content.

The Dove Take

Invisible is inspiring, challenging, and impactful. While it communicates the realities of deep darkness, it promotes gracious light.

Content Description

Faith: Grace in the face of darkness; a message of repentance and belief; Scripture cited, inspiring Christians to put faith into action; religious imagery, including in a church; spiritual lyrics
Integrity: A strong focus on ministry and doing as Jesus Christ would; people seek to help even when it’s not easy; gratefulness
Sex: Discussion of child abuse, including sex trafficking. Reference to sex that’s outside of marriage. A young mother. A young man affectionately kisses a young woman on the side of the face.
Language: People call the kids names like “dog” “rat” and "stupid.”
Violence: Discussion of child abuse, including beatings. We hear a story about a homeless woman being harassed by drunks, and the person who seeks to help almost dies; we see his bandaged head and beaten face. Discussion of violence and death. A man dies while on drugs. We hear about children dying on the streets.
Drugs: Graphic and distressing drug use, including underage users/addicts. We see people frequently huffing solvent from a rag in their hand. Raw descriptions: kids getting high, the horrific side effects of drugs; beer/liquor; “drunks,” “drunkard”
Nudity: A man shows a disease on his bare thigh.
Other: Horrible situations—discussion of abusive parents and family; a major theme is spiritual darkness, including a witchdoctor, “deities” and shamans; filthy living situations; disease; a child has AIDS; addiction; discussion of children dying in the streets; crime

Info

Company: A Relentless Pursuit
Director: Stephen Spivey
Genre: Documentary
Runtime: 52 min.
Industry Rating: Not Rated
Reviewer: John P.