Like a Boss

Theatrical Release: January 10, 2020
Like a Boss
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Best friends since middle school, Mel (Rose Byrne) and Mia (Tiffany Haddish) create a cosmetics company from the ground up. Mia thinks the business is booming while Mel, who keeps the books, knows they are struggling to stay afloat. When the owner of a successful cosmetics company, Claire Luna (Salma Hayek), offers to invest in […]

Dove Review

Best friends since middle school, Mel (Rose Byrne) and Mia (Tiffany Haddish) create a cosmetics company from the ground up. Mia thinks the business is booming while Mel, who keeps the books, knows they are struggling to stay afloat. When the owner of a successful cosmetics company, Claire Luna (Salma Hayek), offers to invest in their company as a partner, Mel and Mia battle to agree to the deal. Mia wants to refuse it and maintain their company—but Mel, who sees the bigger picture, wants to take the deal to save their company. This predicament puts a strain on their relationship and they must work to resolve their differences before they lose their company and ultimately their friendship.

While struggling to come to an agreement, Mel and Mia split ways. It is then that they both realize Claire is trying to steal their company’s products and rebrand them as her own. This realization reunites them as they fight to win their company back. Unfortunately, it is too late so they decide to launch a new company based on their friendship called Ride or Die. The new company is financed by Claire’s previous business partner/friend (Lisa Kudrow), who is more than happy to get back at Claire who did her wrong when she put their business above their friendship. In the end, Mel and Mia crash Claire’s launch party to introduce Ride or Die to the world and throw it in Claire’s face.

Like a Boss demonstrates the loyalty of friendship and how circumstances can’t break its bond. The movie provides moments of laughter and shows the positive result of two friends putting their relationship above all else. However, like most raunchy comedies, the majority of the laughs are directed toward poor behavior and sexual undertones. Although the film demonstrates the result of a strong friendship, due to excessive language, drug-use, and sexual material, it is Not Dove-approved.

The Dove Take:

This comedy may produce some laughs, but heavy language, sexual material, and frequent drug use make it not suitable for younger audiences.

Content Description

Faith: None
Integrity: Even though best friends argue and mistreat each other at times, they put their friendship first and apologize to each other in the end.
Sex: Two characters are seen involved in sexual activity; implied sex by other characters
Language: Excessive use of F, also with “mother”; other profanity includes B, S, A, D, H; other mild language; crude references to both male and female anatomy; uses of sexual language; a character gives an obscene gesture.
Violence: Lead characters jump off a roof into a pool and one nearly falls off a ledge; a golf club is used to break glass; a character is knocked down; lead characters argue and one spews milk on someone
Drugs: Social drinking at parties, bars and restaurants; several women act drunk; lead characters shown smoking marijuana; baby shown lying next to marijuana joint.
Nudity: Women wear short and revealing dresses and loungewear; women’s cleavage shown; shirtless man shown.
Other: Lead character lies, steals and sabotages someone’s food; lead character burps and makes other sounds while seated on toilet.

Info

Company: Paramount
Director: Miguel Arteta
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 83 min.
Industry Rating: R
Reviewer: Karen W.