Kung Food

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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Super Bao, an innocent and passionate steamed stuffed bun, goes through untold hardships and finally grows into a great hero who saves the world of foods.

Dove Review

One thousand years ago, China’s 5-flavor stone was hidden, protecting the gem that makes all foods wonderful (and holds immeasurable power in the wrong hands). When Lord Octopus and his pirate gang set out to steal the stone, it’s up to unassuming, not-so intimidating Super Bao to embrace unexpected friendship, bravery, and sacrifice to save the stone.

Kung Food is an adventure cartoon that features food-like characters with lots of creativity and color carrying each scene. Super Bao, a steamed, stuffed bun, isn’t exactly “kung fu” material. Sent away from kung fu school, his training incomplete, Super Bao is determined to seek help from the deceased Master Lu Chin to become a true hero.

After stumbling into a surprise battle with Lord Octopus’ pirates, Super Bao is stranded with one of the bad guys. These two must come together to find the stone… but will the enemy prevail and destroy food as we know it?

This film is packed with fun-filled adventures children will enjoy, but parents should keep in mind the undertones of Chinese religion, including a discussion about “full enlightenment” and praying to ancestors. In addition, mild name-calling and kung fu, cartoon fighting remain consistent throughout the storyline. However, these elements are mild and create great opportunity for healthy discussion about how we treat others.

Because of these invaluable lessons and fun, creative entertainment, Kung Food is Dove-approved for All Ages.

The Dove Take

Kung Food tells the animated story of an unassuming bun, Super Bao, and his adventure to discovering that true heroism is sacrifice, bravery, and accepting unexpected friendships.

Content Description

Faith: Reference to miracles and “manna from heaven.”
Other: Undertones of Chinese religion, including a discussion about destiny, “full enlightenment”, and praying to ancestors; reference to luck; one character throws several temper tantrums; two characters take one another “prisoner”, several character turn into cartoon-like zombies, creating a few intense moments.
Sex: Discreet jokes about “buns of steel” and “my dumplings” (referring to male genitalia).
Language: Consistent, but mild name-calling: “squid breath,” “fish breath,” “moron,” “idiot”; “I hate those guys”; “Let’s kick some wheat grass”; “holy barbecue”; “wicked poet.”
Violence: Lots of cartoon kung fu fighting, one character threatens plucking another character’s fins.
Drugs: One reference to a hangover.
Nudity: One character says, “People in loin cloths shouldn’t skip underwear”; many characters seen in kung fu, loin cloth clothing (though nothing shows).
Other: Undertones of Chinese religion, including a discussion about destiny, “full enlightenment”, and praying to ancestors; reference to luck; one character throws several temper tantrums; two characters take one another “prisoner”, several character turn into cartoon-like zombies, creating a few intense moments.

Info

Company: Blue Fox Entertainment
Director: Haipeng Sun
Genre: Animated Family
Runtime: 99 min.
Industry Rating: Not Rated
Reviewer: Peyton G.