Bella

Theatrical Release: October 26, 2007
DVD Release: May 6, 2008
Bella
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

An international soccer star (Eduardo Verástegui) is on his way to sign a multi-million dollar contract when something happens that brings his career to an abrupt end. A waitress (Tammy Blanchard), struggling to make it in New York City, discovers something about herself that she’s unprepared for. In one irreversible moment, their lives are turned upside down…until an impetuous action brings them together and turns an ordinary day into an unforgettable experience. Once a famous athlete, and now a cook at his brother’s Mexican restaurant, José has retreated from the world but he recognizes something in Nina, a young waitress, and reaches out to her. In the course of a single day, he not only confronts his past but shows her how the healing power of a family can help her embrace the future.

Dove Review

“Bella” is a film which picks up steam as it goes. It opens at a slow pace but once the story begins to move, it is a quality story worth telling. An international soccer star named Jose (Eduardo Verastegui) is about to sign a multi-million dollar contract when tragedy strikes. He suffers grief for a long time but his life eventually becomes entwined with that of a young waitress named Nina, who is dealing with her own problems. She is unmarried, pregnant, and contemplating having an abortion. Jose plants the thought into Nina’s mind of adopting the child out to a good home and the subsequent story surrounds that theme, as well as Jose helping his brother. His brother Manny is a manager of a successful Mexican restaurant, but he only thinks of himself and not his employees. You will have to wait until the end of the film to learn who “Bella” is, but this name plays a pivotal part in this story. This film is a quality picture with some beautiful cinematography and a good theme, and we award the movie our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal.

Content Description

Sex: A young couple date in the film.
Language: H-1; Su*ks-2
Violence: A child is killed and blood is briefly seen on her clothes; a customer throws something near a clerk with whom he is angry; a girl bangs her head against a mirror.
Drugs: Some drinking of wine and cigarette and cigar smoking.
Nudity: None
Other: A discussion as an unmarried woman considers abortion; a mother's grief is seen as she deals with the loss of a child.

Info

Company: Lionsgate
Writer: Alejandro G. Monteverde and Patrick Million
Producer: Metanoia Films and MPower Pictures
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 91 min.
Industry Rating: PG-13
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter