Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy

DVD Release: April 25, 2019
Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy
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Synopsis

Did Moses write the first books of the Bible? Many mainstream scholars say NO! But the Bible states YES! Award-winning filmmaker Timothy Mahoney (Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus) is back again, bringing new evidence to light in his latest documentary: Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy .

What Mahoney’s investigation uncovers is the invention of the world’s first alphabet in Egypt. Did the Israelites invent this alphabet in time for Moses to write the Bible?

This thought-provoking and controversial film asks hard questions of some of the world’s leading experts in Egyptology, ancient Hebrew and early languages. Filmed in Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Europe and the USA with stunning cinematography and life-like biblical recreations, Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy will captivate audiences of all ages.

Dove Review

Timothy Mahoney hits another home run with this film! He gave us Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus and now gives us Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy, a fascinating documentary on Moses and the origins of the Hebrew alphabet and language. Mahoney, raised in a Christian home, was always taught that Moses wrote the Pentateuch, or the Torah, the first five books of the Old Testament. These books are Genesis to Deuteronomy. But now Mahoney faces skeptics who present him the “Moses Controversy,” their belief that the Hebrew language wasn’t yet invented during the time of Moses and that Moses could not have written the books, that he was not a scholarly person. So Mahoney, as a detective of historical patterns, sets out to find the truth.

His search takes him to the far-flung corners of the world, including London, England, Egypt, and Israel. He chats with professors everywhere, those with impressive credentials that do not believe Moses authored the Old Testament books, and those that do. Sadly, he encounters Christians that have abandoned their faith. One man, who no longer believes Moses wrote the Torah, says he remains open to the possibility of God and classifies himself as an agnostic. Mahoney examines old stones and tablets with ancient alphabets. Could he have found the earliest writings of Hebrew? Various historical figures are quoted too as Mahoney exhausts his search with every avenue open to him.

The documentary does an incredible job visually speaking as well as with the interviews with various scholars. The viewer is swept away to various locations and graphs and recreations of biblical events flash across the screen. The sound of Hebrew music playing in the background adds a nice touch to the film.

The viewer will find it fascinating to see Mahoney piece a pattern together, and his findings are pretty incredible. He discovers new information that others had missed. The content is wholesome and although young children would find it difficult to navigate, we are awarding our Dove Seal for All Ages to the film. For children 8 or above, the documentary is most educational as it is for adults and lovers of history and archaeology as well as those that have an interest in the Holy Bible.

The Dove Take

Timothy Mahoney has done it again—he’s given us an insightful documentary into the history of an amazing man and his people—Moses and the Hebrews.

Content Description

Faith: A strong Christian view from several people in the film
Integrity: Various people want to get to the heart of the truth regarding the author of the first five books of the Bible.
Sex: None
Language: None
Violence: Just the mention of the defeat of Pharaoh's army and chariot wheels under the Red Sea
Drugs: A family drinks wine with their meal.
Nudity: Nude male statue with frontal nudity
Other: A few scholars have turned from their original Christian faith, but others have not abandoned it.

Info

Company: Thinking Man Films
Writer: Timothy Mahoney and Steve Law
Director: Timothy Mahoney
Genre: Documentary
Runtime: 120 min.
Reviewer: Ed C.