Good Boys

Theatrical Release: August 16, 2019
Good Boys
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

The Dove Take

While Good Boys may tell the story of Superbad with lower stakes that more closely match the boys’ young age, it does not remove the crude humor, drug references, and foul language that can be found in other Seth Rogen-produced films. This film is most certainly not Dove-Approved.

Dove Review

The Synopsis

Starting life in the 6th grade is hard enough, but when the Good Boys are invited to a kissing party, preparation finds Max, Thor, and Lucas in all sorts of trouble.

The Review

From the producers behind Superbad comes a reimagining of the raunchy coming-of-age story through a younger lens. Good Boys follows the trio of Max, Thor and Lucas as their first week back to 6th grade has them confront issues more mature than their elementary school days had prepared them for. In particular, Max has a growing interest in a budding romance and in looking to fit in with the popular kids while his two friends are more hesitant to do so.

When Max is invited to his first kissing party, he and the other boys know he can’t go in unprepared. This triggers a series of misadventures across their small town that see them skip school and constantly endanger themselves simply so Max and the others can make it to the party that night and not be grounded. While the boys are ultimately successful in their mission, it is easy to tell that experience has changed their friendship as they reach this next stage in their young lives.

The comparisons to Superbad are easy to make with Good Boys, and with good reason. The film is certainly made for adults and earns its R-rating with its raunchy humor, but it is not hard to feel somewhat uneasy with the fact that this humor is done with main characters who are only 12 years old.

Content Description

Faith: None
Integrity: One main character consistently tells the truth to adults; another seeks consent before kissing.
Sex: Kissing; consistent on-screen depictions of sex toys for comedic, not sexual, effect; main characters search for and watch a porn scene (sexual acts not directly shown).
Language: Repeated uses of F***, S***, A**, and other profanities by the 12-year-old main characters
Violence: Physical violence and use of a paintball gun in fight between 6th graders and college students
Drugs: Plot point around the purchase of Molly (slang for drugs, especially Ecstacy) for older secondary characters; attempt to sell drugs to the 6th graders; underage drinking; fake drugs used in a school play
Nudity: Teens wear cleavage-revealing tops; a naked blow-up doll with breasts exposed
Other: Main characters sell property that is not theirs to a man while their parents aren’t home, steal from college students, skip school, lie to parents.

Info

Company: Universal Pictures
Director: Gene Stupnitsky
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 89 min.
Industry Rating: R
Reviewer: Patrick L.