Turn It Up

Theatrical Release: September 6, 2000
Turn It Up
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Rap star wannabes (Pras, Ja Rule) become couriers for a drug lord while hoping to break into the music business at his up-town nightclub.

Dove Review

Twenty years ago I thought this music genre would die out quickly. It was not musical (to my way of thinking), but rather, harsh, crude, negative, sexist and performed by sleazy types in and out of trouble with the law each week. Twenty years later, it’s bigger than ever. While its biggest stars overdose or stand trial for murdering competitors, newcomers keep popping up, with shoulder chips usually larger than their talents. Although “Turn It Up” is a pretty entertaining look at the underworld side of hip hop music, be aware that you would have to subject to yourself to substantial amounts of profanity, obscenity, crudity and violence to learn a lesson you probably have already figured out. Now, I freely admit that when it comes to appreciating this musical format, I’m a bit of a fuddy duddy. I also admit that any art form done well has merit. Why, even several Christian artists have turned to this style of music to get the gospel message to an audience that may not relate to Sandi Patti. But the lifestyle associated with hip-hop and rap doesn’t exactly exemplify healthy living, physically or spiritually. Or am I mistaken?

Content Description

Faith: None
Violence:
Sex: None
Language: None
Violence: None
Drugs: None
Nudity: None
Other: None

Info

Company: New Line/Fine Line
Director: Robert Adetuyi
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 87 min.
Reviewer: Phil Boatwright