The Glass Window

DVD Release: September 1, 2011
The Glass Window
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sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Climbing the corporate ladder and living a comfortable life, Stuart would stop at nothing to have the best. However, he could not escape his past and it forces him to confront his ultimate decision. As he travels from Manhattan to the Carolina Coast and on to the Bahamas he finds the answer in The Glass Window

Dove Review

“The Glass Window” is a film about redemption and hope. In a world struggling against itself, a self- centered man who’s trying to climb the corporate ladder searches for answers after his father dies before he can make amends for his past. When faced with choices, what decision will you make? Will you choose the love God has to offer or the material possessions of the world?

Themes of forgiveness and eternal hope are strongly displayed in this wonderful faith-friendly film. While the unredeemed Stuart drinks and lives with his girlfriend, he knows inside that life should be better and different. When his boss informs him of a new plan to build profits in the company, Stuart must make a choice to be deceitful or follow the right path.

Dove is pleased to award this film our “Family-Approved” Seal for ages 12 and over.

Content Description

Sex: Unmarried man in bed with his girlfriend; talk of man owning strip clubs but he sold them when he realized that he was taking advantage of people.
Language: Geez-1; G/OG-2; "God Stuff"-1; "Jesus Freak"-1; "This is Hell"-1; Frickin-1; All other uses of God and Jesus are used in reverence.
Violence: None
Drugs: Man has several drinks on a plane and becomes drunk; a couple of bar scenes; man throws up when drunk.
Nudity: Man seen in boxers a few times.
Other: None

Info

Company: Sound Enterprises, Inc
Writer: FSH
Director: Curtis Graham
Producer: Tim Paskert, John McWhirter, Curtis Graham and John Hotchkiss
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 88 min.
Industry Rating: Not Rated
Starring: Jeremy Williams, Howard Anderson, Naima Lett, Alison Burns and John Hotchkiss
Reviewer: Scott Rolfe